Coronado Trail
The Devil's Highway

A biker's dream!

The 123 miles of pavement between Springerville and Clifton feature 460 curves skirting the eastern edge of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests is called the Devil's Highway.

The Devil's Highway near Hannagan Meadow Lodge in Alpine, AZ
marker for Coronado Trail
Scenic byway by motocycle

See Stunning Swath of Arizona

The road is narrow and winding, dipping from one curve to the next, perfect for motorcycles and high-performance sports cars.  All you need are time and a desire to experience a stunning swath of Arizona.

The segment of U.S. 191 known as the Coronado Trail National Scenic Byway cuts through verdant forests and alpine meadows before dropping off the high ramparts of the Mogollon Rim to cactus-dotted deserts below. Francisco Vasquez de Coronado followed a similar route as he searched for the fabled Seven Cities of Cibola more than 450 years ago. The road roughly parallels the New Mexico state line and is thought to Cononado Trail Scenic Byway may be the curviest and least-traveled federal highway in the country.

Coronado Trail Scenic Byway

Coronado Trail Scenic Byway

Length:  123.0 mi / 197.9 km
Time:  Four to five hours of driving time, including over 400 switchbacks
Fees:  The road is free, but some campgrounds charge fees.

You will see high desert and forest, and Native American footpaths also used by Conquistadors and prospectors as horse paths, then later as wagon trails by pioneers. This scenic land has been inhabited by nomadic tribes of hunters, gatherers, trappers, outlaws, homesteaders, lumberjacks, and ranchers.

Highway 666 logo devil's highway